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Caesarea … and more from the Holy Land part 4

January 16, 2012

Midway between Tel Aviv and Haifa is the ancient port city of Caesarea built by King Herod in honor of Caesar 2,000 years ago.  At the top of the first photo is a vertical element, remnants of the aqueduct that fed this vast complex.

Aerial view of Caesarea
Caesarea, Aqueduct section (looking through to the Mediterranean).
Caesarea, aqueduct.
Tatty entrance to an amazing site.
Remnants of sculpture displayed outside of the amphitheater.
Interior of the amphitheater. In the garden (upper left), architectural fragments are displayed on pedestals.
Interior of the amphitheater. In the garden (upper left), architectural fragments are displayed on pedestals.

North of the amphitheater is the hippodrome.
Hippodrome seating, present day.
Hippodrome looking north, with remnants of reviewing stand top right.

Remainder of reviewing stand area, Caesarea.
Hippodrome, Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Caesarea.

Tavern, Caesarea.
Tavern, Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Mosaic fragments, Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Caesarea.
Remains of the Byzantine Governor’s Palace. Caesarea. This was originally a two story palace built for the Roman tax collector.
Section of the Crusader-era protective wall and moat, Caesarea.
The occasional collection of homeless architectural fragments, Caesarea.
Sarcophagus lid with female image, Caesarea.
Sarcophagus lid with female image, Caesarea-detail.
Side image of that same sarcophagus lid, in the evening light.

Nyphaeum, present day, Caesarea.
Just off shore, a collapsed row of columns marks a former border of Caesarea.
Sections of Crusader-era walls pushed into the water by the Mamluks.
Roman era columns were incorporated into Crusader-era fortifications.

The spiral fluting of an exposed column embedded in Crusader-era construction has been worn away by the elements.
Remnant of Crusader-era fortification that incorporated Roman period columns. Worn spiral fluted column from previous image is at top left.

Portal of Crusader-era entry gate, Caesarea.
Interior of Crusader-era entry gate, Caesarea.
Vaulting of Crusader-era entry gate, Caesarea.
Crusader-era embankments and moat, Caesarea.
Early evening, Crusader-era entry gate, Caesarea.
2 Comments leave one →
  1. January 16, 2012 8:15 PM

    These structures are really impressive!

  2. July 19, 2013 12:59 AM

    Great photography and documentation. I was there in April, so I appreciated seeing photos from a different time and perspective. Awesome!

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