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Chrysler Museum receives bequest of European Old Master paintings, sculpture, tapestries, and decorative arts

April 16, 2014
Cornelis van Cleve, Flemish, 1520-1567, Madonna and Child with the Infant Saint John the Baptist and Angels Oil on panel: 22 3/8 x 20 1/8 in. (56.8 x 51.1 cm)

Cornelis van Cleve, Flemish, 1520-1567, Madonna and Child with the Infant Saint John the Baptist and Angels
Oil on panel: 22 3/8 x 20 1/8 in. (56.8 x 51.1 cm)

The Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, VA, last covered by this blog in a December 2013 posting, has received the Irene Leache Memorial Foundation’s entire collection of European Old Master paintings, sculpture, tapestries, and decorative arts, according to a museum press release:

On long-term loan to the Museum since within a year of its 1933 opening, the Irene Leache Memorial collection comprises 27 works of art dating from the 14th through 19th centuries. Many of the works were among the earliest art on gallery view in the Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences, the genesis of the Chrysler Museum.

Accompanying the gifts of art is another substantial bequest—an endowed curatorship. The Foundation has created the Irene Leache Curator of European Art, a position currently held by Jeff Harrison, who is also the Museum’s chief curator. The named curatorship is designed both to memorialize and perpetuate the symbiotic 80-year history between the Irene Leache Memorial and the Museum, giving both a more active and ongoing influence in the future of the arts in Hampton Roads.

The Memorial also will transfer a trove of books and historical materials to the Jean Outland Chrysler Library for cataloging, conservation, and community access. The archival documents, photographs, and memorabilia provide solid research background into the early collections and history of the Museum.

Here are a couple of other works in the bequest.

Francesco Botticini, Italian, 1446-1497, Adoration of the Magi in a Landscape Tempera on wood: 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. (80 x 80 cm). Click on image to enlarge.

Francesco Botticini, Italian, 1446-1497, Adoration of the Magi in a Landscape
Tempera on wood: 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. (80 x 80 cm). Click on image to enlarge.

Museum object label:

Francesco Botticini Italian, Florence (1446-1497) Adoration of the Magi in a Landscape, 15th century Tempera on panel, 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA Gift of the Irene Leache Memorial Foundation 2014.3.2 Botticini’s sweeping, “world-view” landscape is enlivened by a host of holy figures. The Adoration of the Magi unfolds in the foreground, as the three kings pay homage to the infant Christ and proclaim his dominion over all earthly rulers. Behind them the angel Gabriel announces Christ’s birth to shepherds in the field. Encircling these biblical narratives, from left to right, we see Saint Jerome in the wilderness, Saint Christopher carrying the infant Christ, Saint Francis receiving the stigmata, and the journey of Tobias and the angel. Three more saints-Catherine, Roch, and Sebastian-kneel before the holy family at the lower left. And at the bottom, a somber meditative image of Christ as Man of Sorrows alludes to his future sacrifice for mankind. Scholars have puzzled over the meaning of this “holy landscape” with its disparate array of figures. Yet all have acknowledged the charm of the painting itself. With its jewel-like colors and minutely crafted detail, the painting fully reveals Botticini’s deft and delicate Late Gothic style.

Attributed to Naddo Ceccarelli, Italian, active ca. 1347, Madonna and Child Flanked by Four Saints Tempera and Gold leaf on Panel: Overall: 22 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. Click on image to enlarge.

Attributed to Naddo Ceccarelli, Italian, active ca. 1347, Madonna and Child Flanked by Four Saints
Tempera and Gold leaf on Panel: Overall: 22 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. Click on image to enlarge.

Museum object label:

The intimate scale of this triptych-a three-part altarpiece topped with pointed Gothic arches-suggests that it was not a public, church commission, but a work meant for private worship. So, too, do the saints appearing on its shutters. Three of them-Eligius, Bartholomew, and Nicholas-served as patron saints of medieval craft guilds, those of blacksmiths, butchers, and sailors, respectively. The altarpiece may well have been ordered by a wealthy Italian merchant for an altar in his home. The figures’ placement and varying sizes are dictated by their hierarchical importance, an artistic device used throughout the Middle Ages. The Virgin and Child assume center stage, where they tower over the saints who attend them. At left are Saint Eligius, who holds as his attributes the tools of the blacksmith’s forge, and Saint Bartholomew, who displays the knife with which he was martyred. At right are Saint Anthony Abbot, with his book and staff, and Saint Nicholas of Bari, who holds the three golden balls he gave to enrich the dowries of an impoverished nobleman’s daughters. Crowning the shutters is a two-part Annunciation to the Virgin. The painter here is believed to be Naddo Ceccarelli, who was active in Siena, a city steeped in the decorative traditions of medieval art. The artist’s roots are clearly traced in the painting’s luminous colors, richly patterned garments, and delicate floral banding of the gold-leaf background.

One Comment leave one →
  1. April 16, 2014 9:58 PM

    All the paintings you posted are lovely. The Chrysler Museum is fortunate indeed!

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